Loft Conversions Wimbledon

Loft conversion experts in Wimbledon.

Fundamentals of Loft Conversion: Roof Types

What could possibly be a better solution to the problem of shrinking living space other than home extension? Truly, extending the floor space is one of the best ways to address such problem. There are several ways for one to achieve this, and loft conversion is one such home extension method that stands out above the rest. It is popular to many homeowners, and that doesn’t go without reason.
What Loft Conversion Does and Why Go for It

What does loft conversion do? Basically, it transforms the attic into a loft room that can be used for a variety of purposes. Such increases the house’s floor space by repurposing the attic, the largest unused and possibly misused space in the house.

There are many occasions however when a loft conversion simply is not practical or may cost a large sum of money. Nevertheless, many still opt to choose a loft conversion as a means to add more living space to their homes and there are two main reasons why they do so. First off, it obviously does not need lot space to cover as a loft extension means building a new room into the house. Thus, there is not as much need for new edifices as other home extension methods, thereby saving a lot of money on the construction and the materials. The other is that loft conversion can be applied to most houses with a sloped roof, regardless of the location.

3 Common Roofing Architecture

The possibility of having a loft conversion is determined by several factors. One of the most important determinants is perhaps the house’s roofing architecture. The three common loft conversion roof types are as follows:

1. Hipped roofing
Hipped roofs are also known as the “common” rafter roofing due to it having rafter conversion-friendly supports. Outwardly, it features sloped roof surfaces on all of its sides. While convertibility is guaranteed on this roof type, it can only offer a small area with sufficient head room and as such, significantly smaller floor space than what is actually covered by the ceiling.

2. Truss roofing
A common modern roofing type, the truss is defined by the W-shaped beams supporting the canopy. These beams, known as trusses cannot be modified without significantly weakening the structure, thus rendering loft conversion impossible. Should you choose to proceed with the conversion though, you’ll need to replace the roof, often with the more conversion-friendly hipped roofing.

3. Gable roofing
A gabled roof is simply one supported by high walls known as gables in two or more sides. This, like the hipped roof is also convertible, but is more advantageous as its design makes possible the conversion of a far larger portion of the attic. There are three types of gable roofing: gable, gambrel, and salt box. The first refers to gable roofs with a single uniform pitch; the second has two sections, one higher than the other; and the third has a rather varied pitch.

Before starting any conversion project, it is always best to first determine which of these loft conversion roof types is the one on your house. Through this you can learn just how practical the conversion will be, and what type of conversion is best constructed in your attic.